the last boy at st. edith’s

ac8e85eae8b4d11707934851fcab8d3dTHE LAST BOY AT ST. EDITH’S by Lee Gjertson Malone
MG Contemporary
Rating: https://www.emojibase.com/resources/img/emojis/hangouts/1f372.pnghttps://www.emojibase.com/resources/img/emojis/hangouts/1f372.pnghttps://www.emojibase.com/resources/img/emojis/hangouts/1f372.pnghttps://www.emojibase.com/resources/img/emojis/hangouts/1f372.png

Chef’s Notes:

A funny romp that explores standing out and owning one’s differences.

Jeremy Miner is the last boy remaining at an all girls’ school after it tried (and failed) to go co-ed. It’s actually quite hilarious; from Jeremy’s mother’s harried comments to his dad’s erstwhile but not very helpful advice from his boat exploring the ocean, Jeremy’s circumstances are very relateable: how do you stand out in a good way when you’re going to stand out? The book is also very girl-centric: as much as it seems like we’re reading a book about boys, it’s really about the titular character’s relationships with the girls in his life, from his sisters to his best friend, the new girl, and all their classmates. Quickly paced, it also explores more nuanced issues of gender on the down-low. Some of the pranks may get a little tiring, but the humor and well-drawn characters are enough to keep you turning pages all the way to the finish line.

It’s not a re-read book for me, probably because I’m less into MG than other categories, but it has a lot of heart and had me laughing.